banker

Shy by John Inman Review

Review:

Shy - John Inman

Dating is hard enough. Throw in an incontinent Chihuahua, an unrequited love affair, a severe case of social anxiety disorder, a dying father, and a man-eating hog and it becomes darned near impossible. Still, it takes two to tango—and when Tom Morgan, a mild-mannered assistant bank manager with a debilitating case of shyness, meets Frank Wells, who is straight off the farm and even shyer than he is, sparks start flying. 

Just when Tom and Frank’s burgeoning love affair is rolling along nicely, Frank must return to Indiana to oversee the farm while his father battles cancer. Tom tags along to help Frank out and finds himself slopping hogs and milking cows and wondering what the hell happened to his orderly citified existence. And what’s with all the chickens? Tom hates chickens! 

With Frank’s help, Tom grits his teeth and muddles through. Funny what a couple of guys can accomplish when they’re crazy about each other. Not even nine hundred chickens can stand in the way of true love.

 

Review

 

This book is over the top and a great deal of fun. The humor wanders into gross out and that gets in the way of the sexy sometimes but it is all witty and tender. 

The main characters are great and except for Frank’s dad the rest of the characters are pretty cartoonish. But that is okay.

This is a romp with with a slice of sweetness that will take you smile and enjoy the goofy.

Original post:
northamericanwordcat.booklikes.com/post/1594853/shy-by-john-inman-review

Pansies (Spires Book 4) by Alexis Hall Review

 Pansies (Spires Book 4) by Alexis Hall 4 Stars!

Alfie Bell is . . . fine. He’s got a six-figure salary, a penthouse in Canary Wharf, the car he swore he’d buy when he was eighteen, and a bunch of fancy London friends.

It’s rough, though, going back to South Shields now that they all know he’s a fully paid-up pansy. It’s the last place he’s expecting to pull. But Fen’s gorgeous, with his pink-tipped hair and hipster glasses, full of the sort of courage Alfie’s never had. It should be a one-night thing, but Alfie hasn’t met anyone like Fen before.

Except he has. At school, when Alfie was everything he was supposed to be, and Fen was the stubborn little gay boy who wouldn’t keep his head down. And now it’s a proper mess: Fen might have slept with Alfie, but he’ll probably never forgive him, and Fen’s got all this other stuff going on anyway, with his mam and her flower shop and the life he left down south.

Alfie just wants to make it right. But how can he, when all they’ve got in common is the nowhere town they both ran away from.

Review

This is my first Alexis Hall book and I was impressed.

The writing is lyrical and such a pleasure to sink into. I love the detail of the North of England Contemporary setting geographically, historically, culturally and in the dialect.

The romance is compelling. I have a great discomfort with the falling in love with my former bully theme but Hall does a good job of dealing with all the layers though even more self reflection and therapy on both their parts would not have hurt.

The grief and depression of Fen’s character and yet solid internal adulthood paired with Alfie’s outward adulthood with the seeking of a full recognition of self and needs and wants make for a compelling love story.

They are both great wounded loving. people and the cast is wonderfully complex as well. They have friends and family and jobs. Those things all evolve as they fall in love and choose a life together.

The main thing that keeps this from being an smashing success of a romance for me is that Alfie’s character is given more light than Fen’s so that when Fen makes some decisions, we are left a little uncomfortable as to if that his best self because we need to see more of Fen’s healing than we do,

Overall, I highly recommend this book for a lush and engrossing romance.

Madly (New York #2) by Ruthie Knox 5 Star Review!

5 Stars!

Allie Fredericks isn’t supposed to be in Manhattan, hiding in the darkest corner of a hip bar, spying on her own mother—who’s flirting with a man who’s definitely not Allie’s father. Allie’s supposed to be in Wisconsin, planning her parents’ milestone anniversary party. Then Winston Chamberlain walks through the door, with his tailored suit, British accent, and gorgeous eyes, and Allie’s strange mission goes truly sideways.

Winston doesn’t do messy. But after a pretty stranger ropes him into her ridiculous family drama with a fake kiss that gets a little too real, he finds out that messy can be fun. Maybe even a little addicting. And as the night grows longer, Allie and Winston make a list of other wild things they could do together—and what seems like a mismatch leads to a genuine connection. But can their relationship survive as their real lives implode just outside the bedroom door?

Review 

A wonderful romance with such a lovely twist into a Happily Ever After for every kind of love: sister love, brother love, father-adult child love, romantic love.

Ruthie Knox is one of my favorite writers. Her characters are complex and engaging with quirks, flaws, and beauty of the soul. The plots have all these little details which are grand.

Here we get New York City, a dip into the art world, and business. Mainly, we get the heartache of divorce and family with the hope of change and love.

I loved Truely (I am going to read it again) and I love this story of the sister.

Our heroine is a (well I won’t tell you her age cause that is a fun part of the story) impulsive and clever woman who comes to New York on a mission.

The hero is older, British and and open to her adventure. He lets the light in. He is the older not so nice brother from another wonderful Knox romance About Last Night.(which I will be rereading
too).

There is a wonderful mystery in this book and so achey family dynamics. The psychological aspects of the story are superb but you will stay for the love between Winston and Allie…the acceptance….the passion.

It is hot and it is real. It is great and will leave you happy.

I was given this book for my honest review. So, there you have it.